Featured post
Baghouse Tips with Dr. Vent Goode

Are your system’s ventilation hoods effective?

Vent hoods are the point where gasses are suctioned into your ventilation system.  They are a very important component in the performance of your baghouse and discharge system, yet designers often pay little attention to their design and location.

To understand hooding design, first we need to understand the purpose of your ventilation system.  Or more precisely, what it’s not supposed to do.  With a few exceptions in process equipment, the ventilation system is NOT intended to suction dust.  Its purpose is just to keep your process equipment or your enclosure under negative pressure.  Some dust will inevitably end up in the baghouse, but it’s not intended to act like a vacuum cleaner.

Hoods have two basic functions:  They should minimize material carryover and they should minimize pressure losses at the pick-up points.  These two objectives can be accomplished with proper hooding design.

In a nutshell, the larger the hood, the lower the amount of dust suctioned.  And the more tapered, the lower resistance to flow.  There is obviously a physical and cost limitation, so rule-of-thumb guidelines are presented in design manuals to make them reasonably sized.  The typical recommendation is to form a square box as wide as the enclosure allows before tapering to the round ductwork.

hoodVent

Hooding position is also important to minimize material carryover.  Even a properly designed hood will end up suctioning excess material if it’s placed at the wrong location.  In general, hoods must be placed away from the source of dusting, as shown below.

hoodVent2

Properly designed and properly positioned hoods can make a big difference in your systems’ performance to reduce wear on filter bags and discharge system overload.

Call us to discuss your application with one of our engineers today!

Air Quality Workshop

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

8:00 – Registration & Breakfast

8:30 – Keynote Speaker

9:00 – Block Andrews, Burns & McDonnell – “Compliance Strategies for the 21st Century”

9:45 – Jon Norman, UCC – “Case Study: Using Trona & SBC for High Level SO2 Removal”

10:30 – Break

10:45 – Steve Baloga, Novinda – “Amended Silicates™ for Hg Control”

11:30 – Mike Atwell, Solvair – “Trona: a viable solution for SO2, SO3, HCl, and HF”

12:15 – Lunch sponsored by Lhoist

1:00 – Rafic Minkara, Headwaters – “Flyash in a changing Air Emissions Market”

1:45 – Joe Wong, ADA Carbon Solutions – “Advanced Activated Carbons for MATS Compliance”

2:30 – Break

2:45 – Melissa Sewell, Lhoist – ““Dry Sorbent Injection with Enhanced Hydrated Lime”

3:30 – Art Dean, Pine – “To be Determined”

4:15 – Break

4:30 – Panel Discussion

5:00 – Cocktail Hour sponsored by United Conveyor Corporation.

There is no charge to attend this event. Please register online at http://airqualityworkshop.com/locations/houston-tx-nov-3rd/

View the testimonials from the 2014 Air Quality Workshop airqualityworkshop.com/testimonials

Air Quality Workshop

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

8:00 – Registration & Breakfast

8:30 – Keynote Speaker

9:00 – Block Andrews, Burns & McDonnell – “Compliance Strategies for the 21st Century”

9:45 – Jon Norman, UCC – “Case Study: Using Trona & SBC for High Level SO2 Removal”

10:30 – Break

10:45 – Steve Baloga, Novinda – “Amended Silicates™ for Hg Control”

11:30 – Mike Atwell, Solvair – “Trona: a viable solution for SO2, SO3, HCl, and HF”

12:15 – Lunch sponsored by Lhoist

1:00 – Rafic Minkara, Headwaters – “Flyash in a changing Air Emissions Market”

1:45 – Joe Wong, ADA Carbon Solutions – “Advanced Activated Carbons for MATS Compliance”

2:30 – Break

2:45 -Melissa Sewell, Lhoist – ““Dry Sorbent Injection with Enhanced Hydrated Lime”

3:30 – Pramodh Nijhawan, IAC – “Novel Recirculation Scrubber”

4:15 – Break

4:30 – Panel Discussion

5:00 – Cocktail Hour sponsored by United Conveyor Corporation.

There is no charge to attend this event. Please register online at http://airqualityworkshop.com/locations/orlando-fl-october-7th/

View the testimonials from the 2014 Air Quality Workshop airqualityworkshop.com/testimonials

Air Quality Workshop

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

8:00 – Registration & Breakfast

8:30 – Keynote Speaker

9:00 – Block Andrews, Burns & McDonnell – “Compliance Strategies for the 21st Century”

9:45 – Jon Norman, UCC – “Case Study: Using Trona & SBC for High Level SO2 Removal”

10:30 – Break

10:45 – Steve Baloga, Novinda – “Amended Silicates™ for Hg Control”

11:30 – Mike Atwell, Solvair – “Trona: a viable solution for SO2, SO3, HCl, and HF”

12:15 – Lunch sponsored by Lhoist

1:00 – Rafic Minkara, Headwaters – “Flyash in a changing Air Emissions Market”

1:45 – Joe Wong, ADA Carbon Solutions – “Advanced Activated Carbons for MATS Compliance”

2:30 – Break

2:45 – Melissa Sewell, Lhoist – ““Dry Sorbent Injection with Enhanced Hydrated Lime”

3:30 – Art Dean, Pine – “To be Determined”

4:15 – Break

4:30 – Panel Discussion

5:00 – Cocktail Hour sponsored by United Conveyor Corporation.

There is no charge to attend this event. Please register online at http://airqualityworkshop.com/locations/chicago-il-sept-9th/

View the testimonials from the 2014 Air Quality Workshop airqualityworkshop.com/testimonials

 

weekly blog

4 Critical Baghouse Maintenance Issues to Consider

bluecrew man baghouse maintenance inspection

IAC acknowledges industries’ concerns when it comes to maintenance issues and provides knowledgeable, innovative solutions to your problem.

  1. Safety of Your Personnel

Baghouses, like many “work zones”, can be dangerous places. Only those personnel that should be in a work zone or hazardous area are those that have required training.  OSHA confined space entry regulations and first aid equipment and training are just a few of the many issues to be considered when providing a clean, safe, working environment.

  1. Inexperienced Staff and Time Limitation

Baghouse Maintenance staff should undergo regular system operations training.  When personnel or machinery is updated and/or replaced it is critical to have training repeated. The limitations of time and staff inexperience should never be an issue.

  1. Compliance Issues

Detailed documentation of all work performed for compliance reports should always be kept up to date. This documentation may also help with future compliance questions and provide recommendations for future improvements.

  1. Production Downtime

Routine scheduled maintenance can help prevent inadequate baghouse operation. Poor baghouse operation can have many negative results including but not limited to an increase in emission, a dirty, unsafe work environment, equipment wear and tear and an increase in energy usage.

The IAC Blue Crew Solution:  With a service project, scheduled inspection, preventative maintenance program or training seminar at your plant, IAC can help you keep your baghouse operating efficiently and your plant on-line and productive.

Baghouse Tips with Dr. Vent Goode

The difference between Gravimetric and Volumetric feed

A recent question came up for Dr. Vent Goode from a customer regarding Gravimetric/Volumetric.

Dr. Vent Goode,

I would appreciate your help on answering these questions.

  1. What is the difference between Gravimetric and Volumetric feed?
  2. What are the Pro’s and Con’s of each and what is the reason to go with one or the other?

dr vent goode illustration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Volumetric is a system that feeds material in cubic feet per hour, while gravimetric feeds in pounds per hour.  They would both be accurate if material density was constant, but it’s not.

Dry, powdered material density can vary greatly.  If it’s aerated (mixed with air) it is light and can flow like water.  If it’s packed, it is heavier.  An extreme case would be the same material pressed together, forming a heavy, solid rock.

On DSI systems, a certain amount of material (lbs) is required to reduce a certain contaminant.  If we feed volumetrically, we would get variations depending on the current density, which can vary depending on different factors, such as how much time the material has been sitting in the silo.

The gravimetric system actually weighs the material being fed, so it adjusts for density variation.  Bottom line, gravimetric is much more accurate and therefore more expensive.

We highly recommend the gravimetric when accurate material injection is important.  Significant savings can be obtained with volumetric feeding, but injection accuracy in lb/hr will vary as much as the material density.

Regards,

Dr. Vent Goode

weekly blog

How to tell if your baghouse needs an upgrade

If you currently have a Reverse-Air or Shaker-Style baghouse, it may be time to upgrade to a Pulse-Jet baghouse.

Is your baghouse experiencing the following problems?

1) A lack of air volume causing a decrease in production

2) Baghouse’s mechanical parts costing you excessive amounts of money

3) Dust collection expectations falling short in terms of efficiency throughput, or in terms of keeping up with EPA standards, rules and regulations

4) Too large of a baghouse system footprint for your plant

If so, then it might be the appropriate time to either upgrade or change your baghouse system.  If any of these issues may apply to you, you might want to consider the most cost-beneficial plans for re-designing or upgrading your system

 

Solutions (all from upgrading outdated baghouse systems)

1) Air flow could be increased by 2-3x, thus allowing optimum production efficiency

2) Reduced parts due to the system design resulting in mechanical savings

3) Meets or exceeds standards / EPA rules and regulations by improving the media and cleaning    technology

4) The “footprint” of a pulse-jet system is much smaller than that of a shaker-style or reverse-air baghouse.  In other words, a pulse-jet system is typically 1/3 the size of older models, so not only would this new system create more open space in the plant, but in the rare cases where your plant is in a pinch due to a small amount of square footage to work with, pulse-jet systems are not only much more effective but will fit in these tight spots.

 

Converting to a Pulse-Jet Baghouse

Outdated baghouse dust collectors can often be rebuilt or upgraded at a fraction of the cost over installation of new collectors. The collection efficiency of reverse air and shaker designs can also be improved with efficient pulse jet cleaning, typically increasing the amount of gas volume the collector can clean without increasing the collector size. Side walls, hoppers, and ductwork are reused in the conversion, and a new “clean air plenum” with bags and cages is supplied.

Savings occur not only from reduced equipment, but a properly organized conversion can also minimize plant downtime over new systems.

As a “full service” dust collector O.E.M. (original equipment manufacturer), IAC has the staff to not only design the collector, but fabricate the unit, manage the project, and provide the installation service.

Below are a few examples of how IAC was able to successfully assemble a baghouse to meet the needs a unique plant challenged in terms of space:

#2 is an example of a conversion from a shaker-style, reverse-air baghouse to a new pulse-jet baghouse:

“An eastern US Cement manufacturer decides to increase production, save money and downtime by converting 4 existing Shaker Reverse Air Baghouses to IAC Pulse-Jet Filters”

As noted in the article, it is sometimes much more cost-beneficial to utilize what you have.  If your baghouse is outdated or you recognize that a newer model is essential, this does not mean you need to demolish or take down everything – baghouse conversions can be made simple, convenient, and cost friendly

Notable success from this article:

This company was also pleased that virtually no maintenance is now required compared to the old existing filters” and specified that they were much happier with converting their baghouse systems as opposed to starting anew from the ground up, literally stating the process would “save approximately 40% of the cost of purchasing and installing completely new Baghouse filters, and were exploring another round of “using what you have” and making more conversions of existing Filters to the IAC Pulse-Jet Baghouse Filters.

weekly blog

Baghouse – Which Type is best for Your Plant?

Pulse-Jet Baghouse

pulse jet baghouses

  • M-Pulse Baghouse

IAC`s M-Pulse, long bag, medium pulse Pressure Baghouse is designed for efficient operation and effective cleaning for large process gas flow applications. The M-Pulse is especially effective on coal fired, biomass, and other steam production applications.

  • Pulse Jet – Low to Medium Air Volume Pulse Jet Cleaning Baghouse

The IAC low to medium pressure (70-100 PSI) Pulse Jet Baghouse has been field-proven for over 20 years at thousands of installations.  This can be used for either process gas or nuisance/fugitive dust collection.

BAUMCO Reverse-Air Baghouse

Baumcohas been an industry staple for reverse air baghouses on electric arc furnaces and foundries for over thirty years.  When IAC acquired the Baumco product line, IAC inherited a design pool of fabric filter baghouses, evaporative coolers, and air-to-air heat exchangers, along with collection duct designs that can service up to 2,000,000 CFM.  While competitive with the IAC M-Pulse long bag, medium pulse pressure baghouse, IAC Baumco Reverse Air Baghouses may be the best equipment choice for some plants, so IAC is pleased to keep them in our product line-up.

Traditional Shaker-Style Baghouse

IAC builds baghouses with a shaker style bag cleaning mechanism in plants where compressed air is not available for filter bag cleaning or other conditions make it necessary.

Cyclone and Multi-Clone Mechanical Baghouse

The IAC Cyclone Baghouse utilizes cyclonic action, centrifugal force to separate dust and particulate matter from the process air stream. No fabric filter bags are required.  Cyclones can be used as the primary baghouse or the pre-filter to a baghouse filter or other equipment. The IAC Cyclone can be sized and designed, as required by the specific application and many configurations available.  The Multi-clone Baghouse can be provided for high CFM volume or added efficiency.  Support gussets and legs, as well as vortex breaker expansion hoppers and abrasion resistant inlets, are also provided.

Contact IAC today to get help with determining which baghouse is right for your plant.

weekly blog

IAC’s 28th Anniversary

iac building

IAC is celebrating 28 years in business this week as an original manufacturer (OEM), industrial design/ build supplier of process equipment for air pollution control (APC), dust collection, hazardous gas emission mitigation, pneumatic material transport, and bulk material and storage handling systems.

28 years ago this week, Industrial Accessories Company opened their doors with a mission to provide innovative products, services, and solutions world-wide, upholding “best-in-class” expertise to meet and exceed our customer needs. IAC is still doing so today.

For 28 years IAC has provided replacement parts (55,000+) and new equipment components for Baghouses and Bulk Material Handling Systems. IAC has and continues to supply complete engineered systems, as a total turnkey provider, equipment sub-systems, and provides selected new equipment for replacements and new systems. In 28 years IAC has accumulated over 300 years of personnel knowledge and expertise.

IAC continues to grow its business with additions like the Field Services department and In House Seminars that offers IAC Ventilation System and Baghouse Maintenance training at customer facilities. IAC makes house calls.

For 28 years IAC has and will continue to be, the manufacturing industry’s Single Source Solution Provider.

It’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years. – Abraham Lincoln

Happy Anniversary IAC!

weekly blog

Air Quality Workshop – Kansas City

air quality workshop kc

The first of four, 2015, Air Quality Workshops was held in Overland Park, Kansas yesterday. The workshops have been organized by Travis Bowman of Environment Workshops LLC to bring together professionals to discuss compliance strategies and current technologies to meet new Air Quality regulations.

60 attendee’s from various industries, showed up to present and learn from one another at this all day seminar. The lectures, eight in all, ranged from “Compliance Strategies for the 21st Century by Block Andrews of Burns & McDonnell to IAC’s own Pramodh Nijhawans presentation titled “New Recirculation Scrubber”, regarding new technology available at IAC.

All the speakers provided in depth knowledge and expertise which made for a lengthy and informative end of the day panel discussion followed by an enthusiastically greeted cocktail hour with more networking . These workshops are a must do for any industry looking to learn of mitigation products and solutions to bring their plants compliant with MATS & Boiler MACT.

Go to our events page to see the dates and locations for upcoming Air Quality Workshops.

Air Quality Workshop

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

8:30 – Keynote Speaker

9:00 – Block Andrews, Burns & McDonnell – “Compliance Strategies for the 21st Century”

9:45 – Jon Norman, UCC – “Case Study: Using Trona & SBC for High Level SO2 Removal”

10:30 – Break

10:45 – Steve Baloga, Novinda – “Amended Silicates™ for Hg Control”

11:30 – Mike Atwell, Solvair – “Trona: a viable solution for SO2, SO3, HCl, and HF”

12:15 – Lunch sponsored by Lhoist

1:00 – Rafic Minkara, Headwaters – “Flyash in a changing Air Emissions Market”

1:45 – Joe Wong, ADA Carbon Solutions – “Advanced Activated Carbons for MATS Compliance”

2:30 – Break

2:45 – Melissa Sewell, Lhoist – “The Benefits of High Reactivity Hydrated Lime”

3:30 – Pramodh Nijhawan, IAC – “Novel Recirculation Scrubber”

4:15 – Break

4:30 – Panel Discussion

5:00 – Cocktail Hour sponsored by United Conveyor Corporation

There is no charge to attend this event. Please register online at airqualityworkshop.com/locations/kansas-city-mo-june-16th

View the testimonials from the 2014 Air Quality Workshop airqualityworkshop.com/testimonials